Requiem for a Claiming Strategy

imagesOn the surface, it seems too good to be true. You have a married couple, where (let’s say) the husband has earned higher yearly income than his wife. That means he has contributed more to Social Security over his working life. The husband files for Social Security benefits at full retirement age (currently age 66) and then immediately files to suspend those benefits.

As a result of this simple maneuver, the wife is now entitled to immediately receive Social Security spousal benefits equal to half of the husband’s full retirement benefits that were just suspended. She would do this if 50% of the husband’s benefit is higher than she would have received if she had simply claimed her own Social Security payments.

Because he suspended his benefits, the husband can continue working, and wait until age 70 to start receiving Social Security checks in his own name. Why would he do that? Because each year of deferral allows him to accumulate more credits—effectively raising his monthly benefits 8% a year, which is considerably higher than the inflation rate. At that time, the wife would stop claiming the husband’s benefits and start receiving her own Social Security checks. If she was working at the time, she might have raised the amount she could claim under her own name. Or she might have been able to wait to claim her own account until she’s 70, raising the amount she collects just as her husband did.

Presto! More money now, more money later.

This popular Social Security claiming strategy is called “file and suspend,” and by this time next May, it may no longer be an option for retirees. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 that recently was recently signed into law will close what lawmakers are calling the “file and suspend” loophole six in the future. You can expect that eligible seniors will be knocking on the doors of their Social Security offices before that deadline. Meanwhile, those who have already filed and suspended will be allowed to continue as before.

The original rationale behind the file and suspend strategy was to encourage more seniors to continue working. The rationale behind ending it is that it was becoming a drain on the Social Security system. Moreover, Congress was looking for money to offset a huge increase in Medicare Part B premiums for individuals not yet receiving Social Security payments. The provision is likely to pass the Senate, and could be the opening gambit of a broader discussion about how to “fix” Social Security’s messy finances.

Sources:

http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Saving-Money/2015/1102/Social-Security-This-strategy-to-maximize-benefits-may-soon-disappear

http://www.dailylocal.com/business/20151102/colliton-budget-plan-ends-social-security-file-and-suspend

About Objectively Speaking

Tom Batterman, founder of Vigil Trust & Financial Advocacy and Financial Fiduciaries, LLC is in the business of representing the best financial interests of his clients. Having provided objective, fee-only financial management services for over two decades, he specializes in managing the investment and related financial affairs of individuals and mutual insurance companies who do not have the time, interest or expertise to manage such matters on their own. As an objective, unbiased professional who takes on a fiduciary responsibility to his clients, he guides clients to the financial decisions they would make themselves if they had years of training and experience and the time and expertise to fully research and understand all of their options. Founded in 2010 as an outgrowth of Vigil Trust & Financial Advocacy, Financial Fiduciaries, LLC is a financial management solution for individuals and mutual insurance companies who recognize they do not have the time, interest or expertise to properly attend to their financial matters on their own. While there are many financial “advisors”, most of them have investment products to sell and the “advice” they provide is geared toward getting their clients to engage in a purchase. As one of the rare subset of advisors known as “fiduciary advisors”, Financial Fiduciaries does not sell any investment product so its guidance is not compromised by conflicts of interest which plague ordinary advisors. Prior to his employment in the financial industry in financial advocacy and trust positions, he worked at a private law practice in the Wausau area in the areas of estate planning, tax, retirement planning, corporate organizations and real estate. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the UW-Madison Law School and has during his career held Series 7, 24 and 65 securities licenses. A longtime resident of the Wausau, Wisconsin Area, Tom is active in the community. He enjoys golf, curling, skiing, fishing, traveling and spending time with his family.
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