Zika Olympic Worries

You’ve probably heard about the Zika virus, a disease that has been around for years, but is getting attention during this summer season in South America, partly because of the Olympic games that will be held in Brazil. Zika is transmitted by mosquito bite, and is not considered to be contagious from people who have the disease. The common symptoms include fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis, but only one in five people infected with the virus will show symptoms. The biggest danger appears to be birth defects in pregnant women, whose babies might be born with microcephaly—a smaller-than-normal head at birth, which can cause development delays.

Should you avoid Brazil and the Olympics this year? The U.S. Centers for Disease Control has issued Zika related travel alerts for 28 countries, including all Central American countries south of Mexico, Haiti, the Dominican Republic and the Caribbean islands, and the South American nations of Ecuador, Columbia, Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, Bolivia, Paraguay and, yes, Brazil. Only Chile, Argentina and Uruguay seem to be unaffected.

An estimated 1.5 million people have so far been infected with the Zika virus, which has no known cure or vaccine, but is also not considered deadly. Brazilian authorities are currently advising Olympic athletes who compete in the games, starting August 5, to shut their windows and smother themselves with insect repellent. They’re also seeking and destroying any stagnant water pools near Olympic venues, to eliminate mosquito breeding grounds, and workers in protective suits have been videoed spraying insecticide into the air in Brazilian cities. Don’t be surprised if you turn on the TV in August and see stadiums full of spectators wearing long sleeves and pants—and a few empty seats.

 

Sources:

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/latest-zika-virus-recommendations-cdc-advisory-expanded-28/story?id=36664447

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/02/zika-virus-rio-2016-olympics-athletes

About Objectively Speaking

Tom Batterman, founder of Vigil Trust & Financial Advocacy and Financial Fiduciaries, LLC is in the business of representing the best financial interests of his clients. Having provided objective, fee-only financial management services for over two decades, he specializes in managing the investment and related financial affairs of individuals and mutual insurance companies who do not have the time, interest or expertise to manage such matters on their own. As an objective, unbiased professional who takes on a fiduciary responsibility to his clients, he guides clients to the financial decisions they would make themselves if they had years of training and experience and the time and expertise to fully research and understand all of their options. Founded in 2010 as an outgrowth of Vigil Trust & Financial Advocacy, Financial Fiduciaries, LLC is a financial management solution for individuals and mutual insurance companies who recognize they do not have the time, interest or expertise to properly attend to their financial matters on their own. While there are many financial “advisors”, most of them have investment products to sell and the “advice” they provide is geared toward getting their clients to engage in a purchase. As one of the rare subset of advisors known as “fiduciary advisors”, Financial Fiduciaries does not sell any investment product so its guidance is not compromised by conflicts of interest which plague ordinary advisors. Prior to his employment in the financial industry in financial advocacy and trust positions, he worked at a private law practice in the Wausau area in the areas of estate planning, tax, retirement planning, corporate organizations and real estate. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the UW-Madison Law School and has during his career held Series 7, 24 and 65 securities licenses. A longtime resident of the Wausau, Wisconsin Area, Tom is active in the community. He enjoys golf, curling, skiing, fishing, traveling and spending time with his family.
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